Advocacy

My life’s work has been to care for the rural and underserved, women and children, and persons with mental health difficulties.

I am dedicated to uniting, protecting, and advocating for the needs of psychology and psychologists. We need to come together as an organization to advance our priorities and defend and protect our people. We should help psychologists obtain necessary resources to develop to their full potential.

 

APA is strategically positioned to advocate to remove barriers to equitable health care for all people.

 

I believe integrated care in medical, school, and community settings provides a mechanism for health and mental health equity.

APA could increase access and reduce racial/ethnic disparities by identifying neighborhood clinics, schools, and gathering places where psychologists could lead the provision of psychological services. 

I believe the allocation of the advocacy monies by the Advocacy Coordinating Committee (ACC) should continue to be weighted towards the APASI, and I will continue to strongly encourage this. 

 

I have always been a champion for enhancing the role of the doctoral students and early career psychologists in APA governance and on Council.  I will continue to do so by specifically assuring that there is representation of newly elected representatives on presidential initiatives and task forces. (Read More)

I have encouraged the doctoral students I have trained to join APA and participate in leadership and advocacy. 
 
As a Federal Advocacy Coordinator for APA and the Maine Psychological Association, I have trained for over 15 years to be able to effectively utilize my advocacy skills and experiences to address the priority of assuring applied psychology and I-O psychology is included in APA advocacy efforts and is a visible force within APA among external stakeholders. 
 
Advocacy is critically important to our success, and the Divisions need to inform our advocacy priorities.  In addition to our internal “locking arms,” we need to look externally for partners for health psychology advancement. 
 
I believe we need to continue to make the case for adequate funding to provide high quality services provided by psychologists in healthcare settings in rural areas.     
 
We need to convince federal and state government of the essential nature of services provided by psychologists, so that these are required by our hospital systems and medical clinics.
 
I have learned about the importance of emergency services in rural areas and considered how to embed psychological services in the provision of emergency services.  Psychologists may not need to be providing the care; however, they would be the logical team leader and supervisor to create, implement, and drive improved population health for rural residents. 
 
APA is strategically positioned to advocate to remove barriers to equitable health care for all people.
 
I believe integrated care in medical, school, and community settings provides a mechanism for health and mental health equity.

 

APA could increase access and reduce racial/ethnic disparities by identifying neighborhood clinics, schools, and gathering places where psychologists could lead the provision of psychological services.
I have incorporated trauma information in my practice of psychology throughout my career, bringing this to integrated primary care settings and sharing this with CEOs of health centers to extend the reach to impact and inform public health models, which would enable me to effectively support the integration of trauma informed practice within emerging national healthcare models.